Tag Archives: Linux

Why do you need Windows and Linux on a single computer?

There can be many reasons why a person might want the two operating systems on the same computer. For example, you want to migrate from Windows to Linux, but you are not sure whether you would like this change. So, if you straight ahead delete Windows but later realize that Linux isn’t for you (which is highly unlikely) then what? Some users keep Windows with Linux because there are certain software and games that you can not run on Linux, therefore, you need Windows to see them. But is it possible to keep two OS on a single computer? Yes, and here is how you can use both Windows and Linux on a single computer.

The First Step

The first thing that you need is obviously a copy of both the OS. If you don’t already have Windows pre-installed on your PC grab a copy of it. You’ll have to purchase it unless you already have a copy. If you don’t have the Windows on CD make a bootable form of it on USB or DVD-R. You are also going to need a bootable copy of the Linux distribution you wish to install. There are two ways you can acquire a Linux OS. They are mostly free and available on their official website. However, you can buy a disk containing a copy of the OS. This helps the developers of the OS get some money and you don’t have to make a bootable copy of it either.

How to make bootable copies

As mentioned above if you don’t have the OS on disk or USB, you’ll have to make them. For Windows download Windows Media Creation Tool and follow its steps for making a bootable copy. Whereas for Linux download and ISO image of the distribution from their site and use third-party software to make your USB a bootable Linux copy. As for DVD-R, you can use your default DVD burning software.

Linux and Windows are both the computer operating systems or simply the OS. Both Linux and windows are compatible with x86 hardware including intel processors or AMD. Though the function of both the operating systems is almost the same, they differ in respect to their ‘Graphical User Interface (GUI)’.

Here is a brief list of differences between Linux and windows:

Overview of Windows OS:

When it comes to Microsoft Windows, is simply an extended version of the MS-DOS. It is not an open-source OS rather it is a commercial operating system. It means that not everyone has access to source code.

Furthermore, with Windows OS, the user has very limited customization options and it is vulnerable to malware & other viruses if used without anti-virus software. But comparatively, windows are simple to use, easy to access and have a more accessible support system than any other OS.

Overview of Linux OS:

Linux – is an open-source operating system and based on UNIX. It means its source code is accessible to everyone, whether a member or not. The user has a great variety of customization options and can also alter the source code to remove bugs. Moreover, the GUI of Linux comes with certain software that is helpful for the developers to perform their day-to-day tasks.

Unlike Windows, Linux is compatible with all devices including computers, smartphones, gaming consoles, e-book readers, and even cameras & video recorders. The users having a license can easily modify the software in Linux and they can operate this OS on multiple devices at a time.

Though Linux is more complicated to install, it makes complicated tasks much easier to perform. The best thing about this OS is that it is secure from malware and other security threats, even without anti-virus software.

Both operating systems – Microsoft Windows and Linux have their own features and advantages. But when it comes to security, accessibility, and ease of use, Linux outweighs windows. Also, Linux is more reliable and much faster than Windows.

The term IDE means ‘Integrated Development Environment’. It is a computer software application that serves computer programmers and developers in developing new software. Unlike the other programming software and tools, IDEs are open-source rather than commercial offerings. 

Features of IDE:

What makes the IDEs different from other programming software is the features and tools it offers. The whole idea behind this software application was to maximize the productivity of the programmers and developers. And IDE has made it possible by organizing all the necessary features and tools in one user-interface!

The IDE offers a variety of features and tools, and it is not wrong to call it an all-in-one solution. From code searcher, syntax highlighting, to refactoring and code completion, IDEs have it all. In addition to these features, IDE also offers tools for debugging, visual control and visual programming. 

Different Type of IDEs:

As every application and software has its unique coding, therefore every IDE is designed for a specific program. For example, there is a different IDE for developing an IOS application, and the same can’t be used for developing a web-based program. 

In order to create a successful program, the developer should carefully select the IDE that matches the type of application/program he wants to create. Basically, there are four major different IDEs, that includes:

– Web-based IDE,

– Cloud-based to Mobile IDE,

– Language-specific IDE,

– Multi-language IDE.

Benefits of Using IDEs:

The ultimate benefit of an IDE software is that it improves and maximizes productivity. With an IDE, the programmers don’t need to spend days to figure out the right tools anymore. Rather they get everything in one software. 

The fast and easy set-up, standardized tools designed under a single user interface, saves the programmer from configuration and learning multiple tools. This software has made it possible to easily create an application using a standardized program.

Furthermore, other benefits of IDE includes accessibility to development from anywhere in the world, ease of collaborations, and zero to minimal downloading and installation requirements.

Due to the simplicity and similarities in commands of both Linux and Mac OS, users tend to view them as similar operating systems. Although they have similar kernels, both have completely different histories. 

In 1985, Steve Jobs after leaving Apple worked on an operating system called NeXTSTEP OS. In order to make this OS, his team combined some codes from BSD codes and used them with Mach Kernel from Carnegie Mellon. Apple, later on, purchased the NeXTSTEP OS in 1997 as they failed to update their existing OS. Then Apple renamed the OS to Mac OS. Its kernel was called XNU or “X is Not Unix”.  Mac OS is strictly used for Apple devices.

Linux Kernel, on the other hand, was developed by a student Linus Torvalds in 1991 for his x86 intel processor. He created an open-source operating system and posted it on Usenet. Now after 27 years, Linux is the most commonly used operating system. The most famous release of Linux is Android followed by Arch Linux and Debian Linux.

Here we will highlight the major differences between Linux and Mac OS:

1. File Structure

Both of these operating systems have similar command lines. Their differences come into view when you look at the architecture. So, Linux has a data tree on to which it mounts all the drives and files. However, Mac OS stores files in the form of directories, like Windows, that can be accessed as /Developer, /tmp, etc. 

2. Storage

Linux uses the same format of storage for application settings as it does for file storage. The settings can be found in a hierarchy format without any centralized database in existence. However, Mac OS gives the application settings the extension .plist. This file is located in /Library/Preferences and has all the relevant application settings in text or binary format.

3. Switching Network Interfaces

In Linux, you can switch interfaces without the need to install any program. Simply use GNOME or similar applications. Whereas for Mac OS, interfaces can be managed by making changes in the system preferences. 

4. Console

Both Linux and Mac OS provide a console terminal on which the users can write and run commands. Moreover, the terminal also provides information to the users.

In a nutshell, Linux and Mac OS look alike at a glance. But when you dig in a little deeper, you start to understand the key differences that make them incompatible.

Linux is a very reliable, more secure and easy to use the operating system. And because of its number of useful features, most developers and programmers choose this OS for their computers. If you are currently using macOS and want to switch to Linux, then here is an ultimate guide on how you can use Linux on macOS.

macOS Shares the Same GUI Heritage as Linux:

Linux and macOS are somehow related to operating systems, which is why it is quite easy to use Linux on a macOS. Just as Linux has a GUI – the UNIX, macOS also shares a similar user interface with the GNU.

Use or Install Linux on macOS

There are two methods with which you can use Linux on macOS – one is using a ‘Virtualisation Software’; and the other one is to completely replace the macOS with the Linux version such as Ubuntu, Fedora, Linux Mint or Kubuntu, etc.

Use Linux on macOS via Virtualisation Software:

The best and easy way to get Linux on your Macbook is through virtualization software. There are many virtualization software such as Parallel Desktop or VirtualBox etc. With the help of this software, you can run Linux within the macOS environment on even on old hardware.

Here are the steps on how you can install Linux on Mac using a Virtualisation Software:

  1. Download the Linux version such as Ubuntu on mac.
  2. Go to the ‘Parallels Desktop’ and from there select ‘File’ and then chose ‘New’.
  3. Now select ‘install windows/another OS’ via a DVD/image file then ‘Continue’.
  4. The parallel Desktop software will automatically locate the OS files on the computer.
  5. Choose the Linux version you want to use and then again hit the continue button.
  6. Now enter your full name, user name, and password and verify your details then click continue.
  7. The file would be saved in the ‘Users’ section. You can change the location of the virtualization or continue from there.

To use Linux within macOS, go to the Control Center of the Parallels and enjoy the best OS on your computer!

Linux is a free and open source operating system released in 1991 for computers. But today, it works on computers, servers, mainframes, mobile devices, and embedded devices. Linux is one of the most popular versions of the UNIX Operating System. It was designed considering UNIX compatibility and thus it’s quite similar to Unix.

Linux-based operating systems are mostly used by developers to get their work done and develop something new. They are choosing a Linux distro for development because it’s easy to use as well as compatible with most of the programming languages i.e Java, PHP, HTML etc. Today, Linux is ideal for commercial network devices and enterprises who want to use it to customize their own network and data center infrastructure.

The following is a list of best Linux distributions for Development and Server Management:
  • Debian
  • Ubuntu
  • Fedora
  • CentOS/REDHAT
  • Raspbian
  • And more

Please check out our other article to get more information about these Linux distributions here.

Primary Components of Linux

These are the three primary components of this operating system:

Kernel

The kernel is a core part of the operating system. It performs all major activities. It consists of various modules and interacts directly with the internal hardware. The Main function of the kernel is to send instructions to the CPU, peripherals, and memory.

System Library

System libraries are the programs that allow application programs or system utilities to access the Kernel’s features. These libraries are responsible for executing most of the OS programs. They don’t have the kernel module’s code access rights.

System Utility

System Utility programs are responsible to perform specialized, individual level tasks. Beyond tthe operating system it has two modes such as Kernel Mode and User Mode. The system runs programs under one of these modes.

Kernel Mode vs User Mode

Kernel Mode has full access to all resources of the system. In kernel mode programs represent a single process. It executes in single address space and does not require any context switch. Because of which this mode is very efficient and fast.

User programs and other system programs run in User Mode. It has no access to system hardware and kernel code. User programs use system libraries to access kernel functions to get the system’s low-level tasks done.